My husband talked about his recent angioplasty in these posts: 1, 2, 3. So if you’re wondering what it’s like to have an angioplasty or have any other inquiry related to the procedure, then I suggest you read his posts because this post will only deal with what and how much we spent on his procedure.

Like I said in a previous post, we were asked to prepare between Php400,000 to Php500,000 in case the angiogram would reveal blockages that would require angioplasty. To make a long story short, the angiogram showed that diabetes had wreaked havoc on my husband’s heart and he needed an angioplasty to open up some obstructed veins.

The procedure probably took less than 3 hours and the doctor seemed very pleased with how my husband’s heart responded to the two stents inserted in his arteries. With a successful procedure behind us, my husband was sent back to his room to rest and for observation and we were out of the hospital 2 days after that.

Now let’s talk numbers.

As I eventually found out, the cost for an angioplasty can be divided into three types of expenses: materials for the angioplasty, doctors’ professional fees, and hospital fees.

A) Angioplasty Materials

When I was presented with the bill for the materials I was very surprised at the considerable discounts we received. How considerable you may ask, check out this table:

Materials Used Original Price Discounted Price
Left FR.6 Guider 9,750.00 FREE
PTCA.014″ wire 11,700.00 9,900.00
PTCA Balloon size 1.5×15 25,000.00 15,000.00
PTCA Balloon size 2.0×15 25,000.00 15,000.00
Drug Eluting Stent Size 2.5×18 88,261.00 25,000.00
Drug Eluting Stent Size 2.5×18 88,261.00 25,000.00
TOTAL MATERIALS 247,972.00 89,900.00

A hospital staff explained that the companies that sell the materials usually offer discounts because of stiff competition among them. Furthermore, the Philippine General Hospital does not profit from the materials so the patient pays for the materials at cost. Thank you PGH!

Our cardiologist also said that most private hospitals tack on all sorts of fees on the materials so don’t be surprised if a stent with a manufacturer’s price of Php88,261.00 will be priced at Php100,000.00 or even Php150,000.00 each when you receive your bill at a private hospital.

B) Professional Fees (for angioplasty only)

As for the professional fees, the fees covered the services of the entire team who participated in the procedure, not just the cardiologist. We also received some discounts for the professional fees because of Philhealth and because our cardiologist was one of my dad’s oldest friends:

Professional Fee Original Price Discounted Price
Coronary Angiogram Fee 35,000.00 Free
less Philhealth discount
less Personal discount
PTCA with Stenting Fee 250,000.00 250,000.00
less Philhealth discount 16,800.00 (16,800.00)
less Senior discount
less Personal discount 30,000.00 (30,000.00)
TOTAL PROFESSIONAL FEES 285,000.00 203,200.00

C) Hospital Fees

The hospital charges included our 4 days, 3 night stay at the private ward, use of the catheterization lab, medicine, laboratory works and professional fees for the nephrologist:

Services Department Fees Gross Discount Amount Due
Room & Board 3,000.00 600.00 2,400.00
Admission Kit 985.00 985.00
ECG 766.00 153.20 612.80
Laboratories 3,245.00 649.00 2,596.00
Medicine- Cathlab 60,890.00 894.00 59,996.20
Pharmacy (Consignment) 1,878.00 1,878.00
Pharmacy (Revolving Fund) 2,651.75 2,651.75
Professional fee (Nephro) 4,000.00 4,000.00
Philhealth discount (13,500.00)
TOTAL FEES 77,415.75 2,296.20 61,619.75

The grand total for A, B, and C is Php354,719.75. Definitely a big amount but still way below the Php500,000.00 original estimate and also much, much cheaper than what we would have gotten charged if we had the angioplasty done at a private hospital. For comparison, my sister’s father-in-law had an angioplasty with two stents done at Asian Hospital a few months ago and he paid around Php600,000.00 for pretty much the same procedure and materials.

Some final thoughts:

  • Diabetes is a b*tch. If you get diagnosed with it, do NOT ignore it and for the love of all that’s holy, treat it as the serious matter it is. Otherwise, diabetes will slowly eat at your heart and kidney and before you know it, you’re on dialysis for the rest of your life with a heart problem to boot. Huwag maging pasaway.
  • The private ward at PGH is actually not that bad. There were 5 beds in our room but there were dividers in between beds, so there was a semblance of privacy even if we could hear what was happening in every bed.
  • If you’re sharing a room with other patients, please keep your music to yourself and keep your voice down. I had to politely ask some people to put their headsets on because they were blasting their music without a care that they were disturbing other people, specially the other patients who needed to rest. Be considerate please. We all want to get the hell out of there, so let’s not add stress to an already stressful situation.
  • The facilities in PGH are dated and rundown but it’s the staff and doctors that make the place shine. The doctors and nurses actually acted like they wanted to be there and went over and beyond what was expected of them.
  • I don’t agree with some of this administration’s policies, but the Php100 million monthly subsidy to PGH is something that I can totally get behind. With the subsidy, indigent patients will no longer have to pony up the cash for their medicine and medical residents will also no longer have to use their own money for their indigent patients. The monthly subsidy is exclusively for the use of patients and not for infrastructure development, and an unimpeachable source told me that PGH can’t finish the Php100 million monthly subsidy so that means the indigent patients get medical attention and medication for free. Thank you Pres. Duterte for your soft heart towards the poor and sick and using your considerable clout to help them.

Thank you also to all my readers who left comments of support for my husband prior to his angioplasty, it was much appreciated 🙂 Stay safe everyone and keep healthy!

8 Comments on Talking Numbers: Angioplasty Costs

  1. Sera Q
    March 29, 2018 at 3:40 am (4 months ago)

    First of all, glad to hear that your husband’s angioplasty went well. Hope he’ll be on his feet soon. Second, getting sick is a huge burden, and an unimaginable one for people with little to no means. Where would the ordinary Juan get 500k for such an operation? Third, I also don’t agree with a lot of his pronouncements, but funding for education (na wala naman palang permanenteng paghuhugutan ng budget) and funding PGH, a hospital for the people, is well meaning and something that I can get behind indeed.

    Reply
    • Jillsabs
      March 29, 2018 at 10:33 pm (4 months ago)

      Hi Sera,

      He’s doing very well and could have been up and about 3 days after the operation, if not for the bad fall he had on the way to the hospital. The procedure was quick and relatively painless. The wonders of science!

      Reply
  2. Jane
    March 29, 2018 at 11:55 pm (4 months ago)

    That sucks. Glad to hear everything went well. Stay healthy, Folks.

    Reply
    • Jillsabs
      April 10, 2018 at 6:35 am (3 months ago)

      Thanks Tita Jane!

      Reply
  3. Joy
    June 7, 2018 at 1:40 am (2 months ago)

    Hi Ms. Jill,

    How old was your husband when he was diagnosed with diabetes? My husband was 26 when he first noticed symptoms and went to the doctor. He’s now 28. His blood sugar levels are controlled now (been using insulin) but I’m worried about his cholesterol levels during his last checkup. Looking at these numbers, we truly cannot afford an angioplasty should we need it.

    Reply
    • Jillsabs
      June 8, 2018 at 9:48 pm (1 month ago)

      Hi Joy,

      My husband was in his late 30s when he was first diagnosed with diabetes. He was able to control his blood sugar levels with diet and medication but then dropped the ball for years until his heart suffered.

      I wouldn’t be too worried about your husband because it looks like he’s really taking his diabetes seriously. For his cholesterol levels, he should reconsider his diet and lifestyle choices and it would also be nice if the whole family can join him in becoming healthier so that he won’t feel so alone.

      For even more motivation, show him this post and the numbers (discounted at that pa!) associated with an angiogram and angioplasty. Let’s see if those don’t inspire him to make his health his first priority :p

      Reply

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